EHEDG presents: Operational Director Adwy van den Berg
The European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group is delighted to introduce to all of its members the new EHEDG Operational Director Adwy van den Berg. Adwy is currently building up a new team for the EHEDG Secretariat in Naarden (The Netherlands), which will take over the daily operations of EHEDG starting on January 1, 2021. Apart from finalising the transition to Naarden, Adwy is responsible for leading and managing the EHEDG operations, including office staff, consultants ans suppliers, establishing and supporting EHEDG working groups, technical committees and regions, supporting the EHEDG Executive Committee and Advisory Board, and assuring that the values, brand and activities of EHEDG are consitently communicated to its members and stakeholders.   

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EHEDG Guideline Document 50 on CIP now ready for download!

Hygienic Design Requirements For Cleaning-In-Place (CIP) Installations

Do you want to feel confident that your Cleaning-In-Place (CIP) installations meet all hygienic design requirements? Then select, upgrade, design, build and operate them in compliance with EHEDG Guideline Document 50. Download, comply and rest assured: www.ehedg.org/guidelines

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EHEDG Guideline Fish Processing

EHEDG Guideline 49 ready for download

Associate Professor at the University of Zagreb and Chair of EHEDG Working Group Fish Processing Prof. Dr. Sanja Vidaček Filipec explains the value of combining practical and academic hygienic design knowledge. The article provides insights in how the EHEDG Fish Processing Guideline Document 49 helps to tackle food safety challenges in fish processing.

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Every food processing line benefits from hygienic engineering and design, but fish processing is particularly receptive for microbiological contamination. That’s why every fish handling process should comply with the latest EHEDG guidelines. It is also why EHEDG published a new guideline dedicated exclusively to fish processing.

 

Food Technologist Sanja Vidaček Filipec is Associate Professor at the University of Zagreb and the Chair of the EHEDG Working Group Fish Processing. She talks about the unique hygienic design challenges in fish processing and explains how the new EHEDG Fish Processing Guideline 49 can help to tackle fish processing challenges and minimise contamination risks.

 

What sets industrial fish processing apart from other food handling processes?

Sanja Vidaček Filipec: “Firstly, fish come in all sorts, shapes, and sizes and varieties differ greatly around the world. Consequently, there are many technical approaches to processing fish. This represented a challenge for our working group members who committed themselves to develop a comprehensive and international industry guideline. Secondly, fish processing environments are always humid, and humidity is the single most compromising factor for food safety because it manifolds the risk of microbiological contamination. Thirdly, since fish is highly perishable, speed and efficiency are particularly important in fish processing, even more so than in processing red meat or even poultry. That’s why fish trailers freeze their fish right after each catch. It is also why modern industry fish processing lines that make good use of EHEDG guidelines not only optimize their food safety and food quality conditions but also their efficiency and productivity.”


Why did it take until now to develop this guideline?

“In the past years EHEDG published technical guidelines on specific areas of open processing that also apply to fish processing - we refer to quite a lot of them in this new guideline. It took quite some time before all those separate guidelines were detailed enough to support a comprehensive guideline on fish processing. In the meantime, our working group focused on developing a set of fundamental hygienic design principles that would apply to different types of fish processing plants, in line with the basic hygienic design principles in EHEDG Guideline 8. This EHEDG Fish Processing Guideline 49 offers just that and more because it also addresses hygienic aspects that are specific to contemporary fish processing techniques, like the use of vacuum systems to remove by-products. EHEDG Fish Processing Guideline 49 took several years to develop because there are so many food safety and food quality determining aspects to industrial fish processing that had to be investigated. On a detailed level, every fish processing plant has to apply this guideline in accordance with their circumstances.”


Who should read this guideline?

“Everyone involved in the processing of salmon, white marine fish, and freshwater fish can put this guideline to excellent use. EHEDG Fish Processing Guideline 49 is even applicable for fish processing on fishing vessels. Overall, this new guideline offers great value during the procurement process, the plant design, installation, and microbiological sampling phase. It provides a comprehensive overview of all the everyday hazards and challenges of fish processing and does so in clear, non-technical descriptions. All members of our working group wanted to make sure that everyone could understand the principles. We expect this guideline to contribute to a more widespread awareness of food safety and food quality determining aspects of fish processing on all levels in the industry. Now every decision-maker in the fish industry can refer to this guideline and specify what is meant when requesting hygienic design solutions. Moreover, equipment producers striving to certificate new equipment for the fish processing industry know what criteria their components have to comply with. The EHEDG Working Group Fish Processing is convinced that this guideline will help to optimise food safety and food quality in fish processes all over the world.”

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